Articles Tagged with corporatelaw

ESG_Blog-300x157
The surging demand of ESG (environmental, social, and governance) criteria has made impact investing more common. At the same time, it creates more exacting standards for corporations and brokerage firms to comply with.

About Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Criteria

ESG investing—also known as impact investing, sustainable investing, and socially responsible investing (SRI)—is the practice of investing in organizations that follow environmental, social, and governance criteria. These investors want to contribute their funds toward companies they feel act responsibly, and certain criteria are used to measure that.

CG-image-300x208
Corporate governance is an integral component of running a business, particularly when it comes to maintaining compliance with legal standards and keeping company leadership accountable. Employees are often affected by decisions made with respect to how a corporation is governed, but they typically don’t have much say in the matter.

Here, we’ll look into the role employees can have in corporate governance and how they can impact it in a positive way.

The Interest Employees Have in a Company’s Success

Why-Corporate-Governance-Is-Important-to-Investors-300x201
Corporate governance is an important topic for any business, but it can be especially important for new startups looking to secure investment funds. Additionally, it’s also a key point for established private companies that are looking to go public. The reason for this is investors place a great deal of importance on effective corporate governance when deciding to buy shares from your organization.

Why Corporate Governance Is Important to Investors

Ultimately, investors want to be sure they get a return on their investment. As such, they need to be reasonably certain that your company is safe to invest in. That means your company needs to be stable, reliable, and characterized by a high level of integrity. Effective governance helps ensure all of those.

PIERCING-THE-CORPORATE-VEIL-WHEN-YOUR-LLC-OR-CORPORATION-DOES-NOT-PROTECT-YOU-FROM-PERSONAL-LIABILITY-300x200
Normally, those who own or manage a corporation or LLC are not personally liable for business debts. However, there are circumstances where that limited liability is lifted. Those instances are referred to as “piercing the corporate veil.” In other words, the shareholders, members, and owners of the corporation are considered to be personally responsible for the liabilities of the business.

Limited Liability and Business Debts

As stated, a corporation or limited liability company (LLC) provides limited liability protection to its owners, members, etc. in that it is treated as a separate entity in the eyes of the law. Put simply, the business, not its owners, bears the responsibility for its own debts.

The recent bill H.R. 3684, also known as the infrastructure bill, has been hotly debated in the Senate. The bill requires massive amounts of funding, and one of the ways lawmakers are trying to secure those funds is through cryptocurrency brokers. Specifically, the bill would require brokers who deal in digital assets to report customer information, though many have argued that the way it defines “broker” in this sense is too broad.

As it makes its way into the House of Representatives, many people in the crypto-trading space are uncertain about what the bill means for their industry.

Return Requirements for Brokers

Most businesses derive a great deal of value from their intellectual property. As such, when someone infringes upon your IP rights, it’s important to be able to defend them. However, that doesn’t always require a lawsuit. IP litigation can be expensive, so alternative dispute resolution methods are often preferred.

Following are a few ways to quickly resolve an IP dispute without resorting to litigation.

Letter of Demand

The amount of commitment involved in a business acquisition is substantial, and it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into in advance. Thorough due diligence is vital, but at the same time, it needs to be focused on information that’s relevant to the transaction. Anything beyond that is ultimately a waste that could prevent the transaction from ever closing.

Here, we’ll discuss the most important information to ask for prior to completing a business acquisition.

Company Information

If you work remotely, you may be covered by workers’ compensation, even though your job duties don’t take you onto your employer’s premises. However, there are a number of factors that could impact your claim should you be injured on the job while working from home.

Remote Employee Vs. Independent Contractor

First of all, it’s important to distinguish whether you’re actually an employee. If you’re a freelancer or independent contractor, then you don’t qualify for workers’ compensation coverage.

Protecting your company’s intellectual property is a top priority, but finding the best way to do so may be a challenge. When it comes to safeguarding inventions, one of the available options is to file for a patent.

Patents are granted through the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in order to allow you the exclusive right to produce, make, use, or sell an invention. They last for 20 years, during which those exclusive rights are legally enforceable.

Advantages of Patents

The pandemic has prompted various companies to donate patents to research facilities and similar organizations in order to help combat the coronavirus. While donating patents to research organizations and universities can accomplish something truly good for society, it needs to be done responsibly.

A Chance to Do Something Good – If Done Wisely

Often, businesses will hold patents for inventions that they aren’t currently using or developing. They may not find it worthwhile to maintain these patents themselves, in which case they have the option of donating them to nonprofit organizations.

Contact Information