Articles Tagged with Illinois

With the outbreak, more employees are working from home than ever before, and for many businesses, it has become necessary to revisit policies concerning the protection of trade secrets. It can be a challenge to keep proprietary information safe when employees need access to it from home, but it can be done with adequate protocols set in place.

Establishing Trade Secrets

The first principle of protecting trade secrets is to make sure they are legally recognized as such. In order for something to be considered a trade secret, you must have reasonable measures in place to protect it. Without those measures, it’s likely to lose that classification in a court of law.

With more people working from home than ever before, there are much greater odds of sustaining a work-related injury while out of the office. Slips, falls, and repetitive strain injuries can easily happen with home-based work, and they may warrant compensation in the right circumstances.

Self-Employed Workers

First of all, however, a worker who is an independent contractor does not qualify for workers’ compensation. Illinois workers’ comp covers only employees, not self-employed independent contractors. As such, if you are running a home-based business of your own, you won’t qualify for compensation from any of your clients.

COVID-19 has changed the face of nearly every aspect of society, including the way we handle disputes. Businesses and individuals who would normally handle their disputes in one fashion have found the need to adapt.

Obstacles to Litigation

The pandemic has caused courts at all levels to delay most hearings. Some courts are shifting some of their meetings and operations to a virtual platform, whereas others are simply delaying all but the most pressing hearings until things clear up.

The COVID-19 outbreak has affected everyone, including landlords and their tenants. During this time, it’s important for both to know their rights and follow the laws governing landlord-tenant relationships, including the temporary restrictions currently in place.

If you own or operate rental property, it’s important to make sure you stay well within legal requirements and guidelines. Otherwise, you expose yourself to lawsuits.

The Economic Situation for Renters and Landlords

The disruptions brought on by the corona virus pandemic have impacted the lives of everyone, including Illinois residents. Among the difficulties current conditions present are those revolving around personal injury cases. There are a number of ways your case could be affected, and it’s important to know how to move forward from this point.

Seeking Medical Treatment during the Pandemic

One major difficulty is limited access to medical treatment. If you have been injured, you need to seek medical care as promptly as possible. However, with many healthcare facilities treating far larger numbers of patients than ever before, non-emergency care is often postponed.

Two types of planning that business owners often overlook are estate planning and succession planning. While the two are often lumped together—and in some cases overlap—they are separate processes with their own goals.

Here, we’ll look at how estate and succession planning differ.

Estate Planning

A well structured business will have a compliance program in place, complete with company policies, safeguards, and reporting avenues. However, eventually, most businesses will face some form of compliance issue regardless of their efforts to prevent them. In that situation, how do you respond?

Before Anything Else, Don’t Panic

In the event that someone reports a compliance problem in your business, whether it’s a simple violation of company policy or a serious legal breach, it’s important to realize that no compliance plan is foolproof. Unfortunately, these kinds of events are normal, but lawmakers do realize as much.

Rideshare companies such as Uber and Lyft have become vastly popular throughout the nation, including in the state of Illinois. Along with that increased popularity is an increased incidence of accidents involving rideshare company drivers.

Given the parties involved in these accidents, it may be difficult to collect damages. Doing so depends on who is at fault and the role you played at the time.

Lawsuits Depend on Your Role

Illinois tax code is complex, and a lot of it is fairly punishing to local residents and businesses. In fact, one study rated Illinois the “least friendly” state in terms of taxes.

Navigating the maze of tax laws and regulations often requires expert guidance, especially when it comes to more complex tax situations. Here, we’ll look at some of the nuances of Illinois’s tax code.

Illinois Tax Nuances

Personal injury cases have a time limit in which you can file a claim. Once that time limit expires, you’re no longer able to file a lawsuit. The reason for this is to make sure lawsuits are handled in a timely manner before supporting evidence deteriorates, but it can mean the difference between receiving adequate compensation and not.

Two-Year Statute of Limitations

Most personal injury cases in the state have a two-year statute of limitations. That means you must pursue a lawsuit within two years of the incident that caused your injury.

Contact Information