Articles Tagged with injury

Every year, nearly 13,000 people are injured by fireworks. Most of those fireworks are legal, though injuries may result from the negligent actions of another person. In those cases, there may be grounds for a personal injury lawsuit.

Calculating the Worth of Firework-Related Injuries

Personal injury lawsuits resulting from fireworks include various types of damages. As such, if you’ve been injured by negligent use of fireworks, or if the fireworks used were defective, you may be entitled to the following:

Workplace accidents can sometimes be fatal, but even if the employer was at fault, a lawsuit may not be possible due to the way workers’ compensation law works. In Illinois, workers (or in this case, their families) cannot sue the employer for negligence in these cases. However, there may be a possibility for a wrongful death lawsuit if other parties were involved in the injury.

The Workers’ Compensation Trade-off

Illinois workers’ compensation law is something of a trade-off. Employees cannot sue their employer for their injuries (except in certain rare cases), and employers are obligated to carry workers’ compensation insurance. Workers’ compensation benefits are provided regardless of fault, which means that while the employer may not necessarily be directly liable for a workplace injury, they are still responsible for covering the cost of those injuries.

The spread of COVID-19 has caused a wide range of concerns for people everywhere, including worry about what will happen if they get sick. Falling ill with the virus can have a serious impact, and some may wonder if there might be cause for a lawsuit in the event of sickness.

Others may be concerned about the liability they might bear for the spread of the virus. The kind of shape that may take depends on how much of a duty of care will be expected from individuals and businesses when it comes to limiting the spread of the virus.

What Is Duty of Care?

COVID-19 has changed the face of nearly every aspect of society, including the way we handle disputes. Businesses and individuals who would normally handle their disputes in one fashion have found the need to adapt.

Obstacles to Litigation

The pandemic has caused courts at all levels to delay most hearings. Some courts are shifting some of their meetings and operations to a virtual platform, whereas others are simply delaying all but the most pressing hearings until things clear up.

With concerns about infectious disease going around, it’s more important than ever for employers to maintain a healthy work environment for their employees. There are many ways to accomplish this, but they all require diligent effort.

Workplace Wellness and Employer Liability

Before we get into the details on how to keep your work environment as healthy as possible, it’s worth noting where employers are liable when it comes to the health of their employees.

If you have been injured as a result of another person’s negligence, it’s natural to want to see that person punished. However, the primary purpose of personal injury damages is to compensate you for your injury, not necessarily to punish those responsible.

That said, punitive damages are occasionally assessed in order to directly penalize those responsible for an accident or injury. That said, they don’t apply in most cases, so they’re fairly rare.

Understanding Punitive Damages

Some of the most common questions Illinois residents have when it comes to worker’s compensation—as well as their answers—include those below.

What Injuries Does Workers’ Compensation Cover?

Workers’ compensation is designed to cover work-related injuries. As such, it pays for injuries or serious illnesses contracted in the course of your work duties.

Illinois workers’ compensation law prevents employees from suing their employers in the event of a workplace injury, including illnesses contracted on the job.

However, employees may be able to recover benefits if they become ill as a result of performing workplace duties.

Workers’ Compensation and Employer Liability

Rideshare companies such as Uber and Lyft have become vastly popular throughout the nation, including in the state of Illinois. Along with that increased popularity is an increased incidence of accidents involving rideshare company drivers.

Given the parties involved in these accidents, it may be difficult to collect damages. Doing so depends on who is at fault and the role you played at the time.

Lawsuits Depend on Your Role

Personal injury cases have a time limit in which you can file a claim. Once that time limit expires, you’re no longer able to file a lawsuit. The reason for this is to make sure lawsuits are handled in a timely manner before supporting evidence deteriorates, but it can mean the difference between receiving adequate compensation and not.

Two-Year Statute of Limitations

Most personal injury cases in the state have a two-year statute of limitations. That means you must pursue a lawsuit within two years of the incident that caused your injury.

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