Articles Posted in Personal Injury

Spinal cord injuries can be catastrophic, often resulting in severe lifelong disability. If one of these injuries results from negligence on the part of another party, it may be worth a significant amount in damages.

Typical Damages for Spinal Cord Injuries

For extreme spinal cord injuries resulting in lifetime tetraplegia (loss of use of all four limbs), the average lifetime medical costs are estimated to be over $5 million by The National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center. However, many spinal cord injuries only result in a partial loss of mobility, such as paraplegia (lost use of the legs and lower body).

Given the concentration of illness present at many healthcare facilities, it’s important for them to take stringent measures to prevent the spread of disease such as COVID-19 and common hospital infections. If you fall seriously ill as a result of being treated at a hospital, you may have a case, though there are factors that could keep you from recovering damages.

Note that during the coronavirus pandemic in Illinois, any healthcare facility that provides care or assistance for those who have contracted COVID-19 has some immunity to liability, so if your illness dates to this time, you likely won’t be able to recover damages.

Cases Involving Medical Infections

The spread of COVID-19 has caused a wide range of concerns for people everywhere, including worry about what will happen if they get sick. Falling ill with the virus can have a serious impact, and some may wonder if there might be cause for a lawsuit in the event of sickness.

Others may be concerned about the liability they might bear for the spread of the virus. The kind of shape that may take depends on how much of a duty of care will be expected from individuals and businesses when it comes to limiting the spread of the virus.

What Is Duty of Care?

Healthcare providers throughout the state are facing challenges as the COVID-19 outbreak fills more hospital beds than ever before. On top of that, lower staff numbers and a ban on elective procedures add to the difficulty.

Perhaps for these reasons, the governor has granted many providers full immunity from civil liability for the duration of this emergency, making malpractice claims far more difficult—if not impossible—to pursue.

Immunity to Civil Liability

The disruptions brought on by the corona virus pandemic have impacted the lives of everyone, including Illinois residents. Among the difficulties current conditions present are those revolving around personal injury cases. There are a number of ways your case could be affected, and it’s important to know how to move forward from this point.

Seeking Medical Treatment during the Pandemic

One major difficulty is limited access to medical treatment. If you have been injured, you need to seek medical care as promptly as possible. However, with many healthcare facilities treating far larger numbers of patients than ever before, non-emergency care is often postponed.

If you have been injured as a result of another person’s negligence, it’s natural to want to see that person punished. However, the primary purpose of personal injury damages is to compensate you for your injury, not necessarily to punish those responsible.

That said, punitive damages are occasionally assessed in order to directly penalize those responsible for an accident or injury. That said, they don’t apply in most cases, so they’re fairly rare.

Understanding Punitive Damages

Hospital workers, including RNs, CNAs, and LPNs, face numerous challenges in their fast-paced line of work. These challenges often lead to injury, and it’s important for nurses to know that they are entitled to workers’ compensation if that happens.

Workers’ Compensation Laws for Hospital Workers

Illinois workers’ compensation laws cover the vast majority of employees in the state, including nurses. The law is a no-fault system, meaning you don’t have to prove fault in order to collect compensation for your injury.

Rideshare companies such as Uber and Lyft have become vastly popular throughout the nation, including in the state of Illinois. Along with that increased popularity is an increased incidence of accidents involving rideshare company drivers.

Given the parties involved in these accidents, it may be difficult to collect damages. Doing so depends on who is at fault and the role you played at the time.

Lawsuits Depend on Your Role

Personal injury cases have a time limit in which you can file a claim. Once that time limit expires, you’re no longer able to file a lawsuit. The reason for this is to make sure lawsuits are handled in a timely manner before supporting evidence deteriorates, but it can mean the difference between receiving adequate compensation and not.

Two-Year Statute of Limitations

Most personal injury cases in the state have a two-year statute of limitations. That means you must pursue a lawsuit within two years of the incident that caused your injury.

Often, injuries result from a faulty product. A case involving this type of injury falls under product liability, in which either the manufacturer, the party who designed the product, or those in charge of marketing and labeling are held responsible for any damages that may result.

These types of claims are further divided into different categories depending on which party is responsible.

Main Types of Product Liability

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